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Difference between 2D and 2D axisymetric

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Old   April 12, 2013, 00:40
Default Difference between 2D and 2D axisymetric
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Hello,
Im solving a flow through circular pipe. I am specifying pressure drop. When I use a axisymetric case, I get the velocity as per the Hagen Poiseuille Equation. But when I try to solve it using a 2D case it gives me velocity exactly twice of the axisymmetric case.
Or simply put the avg. velocity which I am getting after running a 2D case is twice as what I should get from the Hagen Poiseuille Equation.
Where can I possibly go wrong while simulating these two cases? Thanks.

Varad
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Old   April 12, 2013, 00:45
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Or simply put the avg. velocity which I am getting after running a 2D case is twice as what I should get from the Hagen Poiseuille Equation.
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Old   April 12, 2013, 02:19
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2d axisymmetric simulates a cilindrical pipe, 2d simulation a square/rectangular duct; what are your boundary conditions?under reference values what is the value for "depth"?

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Old   April 12, 2013, 09:30
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Reference value for depth is 1..
pressure inlet and pressure outlet with no slip conditions on the walls..
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Old   April 14, 2013, 02:04
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ghost82 View Post
2d axisymmetric simulates a cilindrical pipe, 2d simulation a square/rectangular duct; what are your boundary conditions?under reference values what is the value for "depth"?

Daniele
I would like to add further. For shapes other than cylinder, rectangle and square you have to model it as quarter or half symmetrical at least (3D).
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Old   April 14, 2013, 11:06
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Thank you guys for ur replies..
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Old   April 14, 2013, 11:19
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Originally Posted by vagaikwa View Post
Reference value for depth is 1..
pressure inlet and pressure outlet with no slip conditions on the walls..
This means that when you are simulating a 2d model, you have a rectangular duct which has an inlet/outlet area of 'your coordinate' x 1 m (depth under reference values).

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Old   April 14, 2013, 20:14
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No, this is incorrect. 2D models are infinitely long in the spanwise direction (Z axis, which you are not modelling). Any geometry that has a finite span, or does not have a perfect cylindrical cross section at all stations along its length must be modeled in 3D.

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Old   April 15, 2013, 13:09
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No, this is incorrect. 2D models are infinitely long in the spanwise direction (Z axis, which you are not modelling). Any geometry that has a finite span, or does not have a perfect cylindrical cross section at all stations along its length must be modeled in 3D.

Stu
yes you are right, that means that since you are not modeling the z coordinate, you are assuming that interactions occur in the x-y directions.
However I meant that if you are assigning for example an inlet velocity of 1 m/s and you have set a depth of 1 m with the inlet edge 0,2 m long your resulting flowrate will be 0,2x1x1 m3/s.
For sure you are not modeling z interactions.

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