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-   -   Fluent for many particles?? (http://www.cfd-online.com/Forums/fluent/27466-fluent-many-particles.html)

Arturo Ortiz January 27, 2000 14:51

Fluent for many particles??
 
I will try to model the flow of many (small) particles in a fluid and I am surveying the available softwares. I would like initially to simulate the fluid as a pseudo-homogeneus fluid but I think that the final goal is to simulate the particles in a discrete element-like approach (tracking of each particle). I do not know the possibilities of Fluent and would like to know if somebody has some experience in this kind of simulation and if you think that Fluent (or maybe other software) can handle this problem. Thanks in advance for any help

Arturo

Aaron J. Bird January 27, 2000 16:17

Re: Fluent for many particles??
 
Fluent can do many particles... or just a few. There are settings for particle density, particle size, wall interaction (rebound, adhere, etc), and also submicrometer tracking capabilities. For turbulent flows a stochastic method is used in a random walk model. A particle cloud tracking model is also available in which the average of many particle tracks is used to predict the general trend of the "cloud". Very basically, the method is to solve the flow field on your mesh, then apply the particle tracking. I've done some particle tracking models, but had problems in making validation comparisons. A simplified way to do this is to know in advance the particle concentration (mass or number) flux across or through or past some point in the geometry, then compare the simulated flux to see if you're in the ballpark, and then adjust your inputs as necessary.

Ursenbacher Frederic January 28, 2000 07:10

Re: Fluent for many particles??
 
Hi,

I've some experience in particle tracking using Fluent. The first thing I suggest you to do is to calculate the particle Reynolds number. It gives an indication of the best drag law that is to apply in order to compute the drag force acting on the particle. Then apply the method describe by Aaron J. Bird.

The injection of discrete phase is a very complicated phenomena and the computed results you obtain doesn't often represent the reality.

F.Ursenbacher

eloy785 June 29, 2010 12:31

hi

I'm working with fluent 6.3.26 and i want to know if i can put an specific quantity (KG) in a specific wall and then set a velocity inlet in order to carry out the particles in the wall.

regards


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