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-   -   Fluent Linux and OS (http://www.cfd-online.com/Forums/fluent/68284-fluent-linux-os.html)

mortain September 13, 2009 15:40

Fluent Linux and OS
 
Hi,
I would like to install fluent on PC but I don't know which OS is the best?

I know that linux uses better than windows the processor resources so I was wondering if it could be better install fluent on Linux.

What distribution of Linux should I prefer, in your opinion?

Thank you
Antonio

audrich September 13, 2009 22:50

I am no expert on which OS utilizes resources the best, but the issue should only concern you if you plan on doing very complicated and extensive simulations, otherwise you won't notice much difference in computation time between Windows and any Linux distro. So if you're not doing something that is already taking days or weeks to complete on Windows, don't bother switching OS for it.

If you do decide to use Linux, Ubuntu is the most popular distro with the "best" user support for Linux newbies, and you'll definitely run into plenty of issues if you've never used a Linux system before. My university fluids research department uses Fedora for what it's worth, but again I don't know which is exactly better. Try either Ubuntu or Linux Mint. I've run Fluent on Ubuntu just fine, ditto for Fedora.

onlyblue September 13, 2009 23:00

SuSE Linux is best for runing FLUENT
 
OpenSuSE is also good

mortain September 14, 2009 03:22

In m y university they use OpenSuse.
I won't run complicated simulations, but I don't want to waste time. Vista uses 1 GB of Ram instead linux is lighter, that's my opinion.

My only problem is if I should configure linux , that is video, audio, processor, mouse etc etc or if open suse recognize the peripheral.

Thank you

onlyblue September 14, 2009 05:51

i want to know your mesh number of your model.
if your mesh number is less than 1 million
i think there is no difference between using linux and using windows.
Linux is good for large mesh number.

audrich September 14, 2009 10:06

Any Linux should pick up basic peripherals just fine during installation, although you may have some problems with sound and video because Linux prefers open source drivers over proprietary ones. That is no problem with simple standard stuff like keyboards and mice, but with video cards, you may end up with graphics errors during simulation.

If that happens you can still get the proprietary drivers and use those (assuming they make ones for Linux). Long story short, you don't have to fear that your computer will go black and not respond once you install Linux, but you may have annoying bugs due to open source drivers.

Also, if 1 GB RAM is significant resources for your home computer, consider just remote connecting to a more powerful computer on your campus designated for this. Ask your IT guy, or fluids/heat professor, for an account to access the computers off campus and you don't have to use up your computer's resources. I run Fluent on my laptop with 256MB for a few small tests, but I dial in to a 10GB machine when I need to crank out optimization stuff that takes days.

Amiga500 September 15, 2009 04:56

Does fluent work with non-red-hat-enterprise (RHE) versions of Linux?


If you need a RHE compatible version of linux - then I would recommend trying scientific linux.

I've used it in the past with ANSYS CFX.

fluent-user September 15, 2009 07:40

I have Fluent and Gambit running on Suse Enterprise 10 at work. Works very good and stable. I think it would also work well on openSUSE. I would recommend this OS.

mortain September 15, 2009 10:49

Quote:

Originally Posted by Amiga500 (Post 229523)
Does fluent work with non-red-hat-enterprise (RHE) versions of Linux?


If you need a RHE compatible version of linux - then I would recommend trying scientific linux.

I've used it in the past with ANSYS CFX.

I can't understand you.
What is a RHE version? What is scientific linux....

thanks

audrich September 15, 2009 12:10

Red Hat is a company that makes one particular distro of Linux called Fedora. Because it is made by a professional company seeking profits rather than volunteers, it can be argued to be more stable and polished.

But you don't need a RH distro to run Fluent. Debian and SUSE work for sure, probably others as well.


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