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-   -   Xeon E5606 vs. Xeon E5645 (http://www.cfd-online.com/Forums/hardware/104204-xeon-e5606-vs-xeon-e5645.html)

lakhi July 5, 2012 00:54

Xeon E5606 vs. Xeon E5645
 
I'm working on Transient RSM model (including DPM) with 1.3 million Hex cells. I may switch on to LES in the latter stages. I've the following options:

INTEL XEON E-5606 CPU ( 2.6 GHz )
MOTHERBOARD S-5500 BCR INTEL
4x4GB DDR III RAM ECC KINGSTON

INTEL XEON E-5645 CPU ( 2.6 GHz ) 6 CORE

MOTHERBOARD S-5520 SCR INTEL
2x8GB DDR III RAM ECC REGD KINGSTON

Is this configuration good enough to run my simulations smoothly?

Which graphics card shall I go for?


I think Intel® Xeon® Processor E5-2687W will be out of my range, otherwise it would have been a good option !

Suggestions, if any, will be appreciated.

CapSizer July 5, 2012 04:27

Either of those configurations will run your simulations "smoothly". However, you would sacrifice performance due to the older type of memory configuration. The motherboard specifications indicate that both boards will only support up to 1333 MHz memory, whereas the more recent designs can use 1600 MHz memory. Even more important is the number of memory lanes. The S-5500 BCR board has only 4 memory lanes, and the S-5520 SCR has 6 lanes to feed the two sockets. The current dual-CPU boards for either Intel E5-* or AMD G34 sockets all have 8 lanes for 1600 MHz memory to feed two sockets. If your budget is limited, consider sacrificing CPU clock speed in favour of the faster memory sub-systems of the more recent designs. And you also need to make sure that you actually install the memory correctly, so that you can get the full benefit of the parallel memory lanes. Putting less than 6 memory modules into the S-5520 board would slow it down quite dramatically.

lakhi July 5, 2012 09:34

Thanx CapSizer, I got it. Few people are suggesting me to go with AMD processor, but as far as i know, the latest amd processor has lesser "per core" performance than even intel i5 processor. Is this true? Within this budget, is there any other combination with atleast 8 cores ? I need some help coz I'm not very sound in this field and I've to purchase one soon !

CapSizer July 5, 2012 10:26

Quote:

Originally Posted by lakhi (Post 369931)
Thanx CapSizer, I got it. Few people are suggesting me to go with AMD processor, but as far as i know, the latest amd processor has lesser "per core" performance than even intel i5 processor. Is this true? Within this budget, is there any other combination with atleast 8 cores ? I need some help coz I'm not very sound in this field and I've to purchase one soon !

Yes, the AMD performance per core is less than Intel. However, for the same cost, you can get more cores. If, however, your software licensing is limiting you to 8 cores, then obviously you need to get the fastest 8 cores that you can afford. BUT. First make sure that you get the maximum number of 1600 MHz memory channels. This site is quite a handy way of figuring out what your options are within a given budget: http://www.elnexus.com/default.aspx I have never dealt with the company, but it least they have a brilliant tool for checking configurations. It turns out that you can get bottom of the range Xeon E5 or Opteron 62-series processor-based systems with 8 memory channels for around USD 2500. The Xeons are likely to be a little faster per core, the AMD will give you more cores. Overall, because both systems give you the same memory setup, the performance is likely to be quite similar, provided that your software license allows you to benefit form the extra AMD cores.

lakhi July 6, 2012 03:04

Hi CapSizer, thanks once again for your valuable suggestions. After hearing from you, I'm refining my search. Now i think i shall expand my budget to get something better. If I go with two "INTEL XEON E-5606 CPU", which motherboard shall I opt, which graphics card shall I look for, and what should be the RAM distribution pattern (say 16 GB RAM) for best performance? If you can suggest some good configs that may further help me out.

CapSizer July 6, 2012 04:31

Well, the problem with the E5606 CPU is that it is inexpensive because it is last year's technology. A board that supports them is the ASUS Z8NA-D6, which uses the handy standard ATX form factor, so it is easy and inexpensive to assemble a system. Just remember that with this setup you only get 6 channels of 1333 MHz RAM. If performance is really crucial, you want a system that will give you 8 channels of 1600 MHz RAM. With the E5606, you need to populate 6 channels of RAM, so you either need to settle for 12 GB, or go for 24 GB.

Don't underestimate the effect of Moore's law (or observation, if you prefer). Computer power doubles more or less every 18 months, and the E5606 is now 18 months old. If you can, rather buy the latest. My suggestion would be to go for the cheapest current model Xeon (E5-2620) or Opteron (6212) combined with the appropriate 8-channel 1600 MHz motherboards.

For the graphics card, it is a question of how much power you really need. If you are only post-processing fairly small CFD models (say less than 2 million cells), you don't need anything special, so you can save money on it.

If you want more help, send me a PM.


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