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sefde September 1, 2012 15:54

Computer Specification For The CFD Analysis
 
can someone please tell a good computer specification of the cfd analysis such as the meshing and the aerodynamics simulation, of an entire f1 car and an entire boeing 747 airplane?

thank you

abdul099 September 6, 2012 16:50

Depends a little on your requirements regarding accuracy and turnaround time and also on the used code.

For meshing an entire F1 car (and also the B747) with a good resolution (assuming it's not just to play around but to get reasonable results), you'll need a big machine. I gained some F1 experience two years ago, using Star-CCM+. We created meshes with approx. 120 million cells for a symmetric model of a F1 car (only one half was meshed).
Memory will be the most important thing while computing power is less important. Most meshers will not benefit of many cores.
We had machines with 48GB ram, but that was not nearly enough to mesh the whole car in one portion. I would say, 96 to 128 GB is the minimum as long as other codes don't need significantly less memory.

For solving, I would stick to a cluster. Solving of a 120 million cells mesh on 256 cpu's took about 20 hours, so you can easily calculate the duration on let's say a dual Xeon E machine with 16 cores. It will not scale linear, therefore it will be faster than 320 hours, but it will be painful long.

When you don't have the money to buy a f...ing expensive cluster, there are plenty of offers to buy computing time. Amazon should be one of the best-known, but there are many others as well. Just browse the web, and sometimes you can find offers in the ad banners here on this site.

sefde September 7, 2012 10:58

Quote:

Originally Posted by abdul099 (Post 380639)
Depends a little on your requirements regarding accuracy and turnaround time and also on the used code.

For meshing an entire F1 car (and also the B747) with a good resolution (assuming it's not just to play around but to get reasonable results), you'll need a big machine. I gained some F1 experience two years ago, using Star-CCM+. We created meshes with approx. 120 million cells for a symmetric model of a F1 car (only one half was meshed).
Memory will be the most important thing while computing power is less important. Most meshers will not benefit of many cores.
We had machines with 48GB ram, but that was not nearly enough to mesh the whole car in one portion. I would say, 96 to 128 GB is the minimum as long as other codes don't need significantly less memory.

For solving, I would stick to a cluster. Solving of a 120 million cells mesh on 256 cpu's took about 20 hours, so you can easily calculate the duration on let's say a dual Xeon E machine with 16 cores. It will not scale linear, therefore it will be faster than 320 hours, but it will be painful long.

When you don't have the money to buy a f...ing expensive cluster, there are plenty of offers to buy computing time. Amazon should be one of the best-known, but there are many others as well. Just browse the web, and sometimes you can find offers in the ad banners here on this site.

From all terms of the computer parts you had mentioned above, I only understand on memory. What is cluster and cells?

rwryne September 7, 2012 14:41

Quote:

Originally Posted by sefde (Post 380744)
From all terms of the computer parts you had mentioned above, I only understand on memory. What is cluster and cells?


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_cluster

by Cells, he means mesh cells.

sefde September 22, 2012 12:08

Quote:

Originally Posted by rwryne (Post 380780)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_cluster

by Cells, he means mesh cells.

Thank you.


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