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tompeat March 2, 2010 08:11

New turbine
 
I have invented a new turbine! No one is going to beleive this but i can not find an other example of this type of turbine. The problem i have is ;where to look for a list of known turbines? I have tried the "mueasum of retrotech" and countless serches of patents and images but i find nothing similar.

The second obvious thought is 'its not going to work' ,becaus people have rejected this idea as a non-runner . So someone clever might like to take a look. But how would i do this without giving to obvious secret away?

The third problem is it will take a lot of simulation and modeling to even get near an efficent version and i only have a lap top and a wood working shop. (inadvertent ryme).

any suggesgions welcome

yours tom peat

Chromatix March 6, 2010 12:11

Sounds like you have two separate problems to solve:

- Does it work?

I can't really help you with that one - you'll have to simulate or prototype it yourself, and compare it with the performance of existing turbines doing the same job.

- Is it novel?

Now this is a question I might have some suggestions on. As you are probably aware, it is extremely rare for anyone to come up with something genuinely new - the problem is that many inventions remain obscure for a variety of reasons. The usual reason is simply that it doesn't work - or at least, doesn't work sufficiently better than an existing machine to be worthwhile. ;) So many people who think they have something new, actually just have something mediocre.

Now, I'm not going to ask you to disclose the details or your design, but you should consider some general parameters to focus your search:

- What medium does it work on? Steam? Gas/flame? Liquid?

- What principle does it use? Does it convert mostly momentum or pressure? There are advanced types of water wheel that are considered momentum turbines.

- Is it actually an expansion engine, and not a turbine at all? Google "Rotary Steam Engine" for an example (which incidentally, was a repeated failed invention during the 19th century - some of them worked, but none were efficient, and all wore out very quickly like early Wankel engines).

- What applications can you imagine it sensibly being used in?

- What sizes does it scale to? Is it generally industrial-sized (power station, liner-sized marine), locomotive sized (minesweeper/small commercial marine), automotive/domestic sized (yacht-sized marine), miniature or micro (portable or personal equipment)? Feel free to make up your own category if it makes sense.

tompeat March 24, 2010 19:46

hi and thanks for the advice . At the risk of being though crazy i am considering submitting a paper to the european turbomechinery conference 2011. the only problem is i need a colaborator who can do some cfd on the basic idea. Any one who has acess both solid modeling programs and 3d flow calcs would be best . you will also have to have an
extreamly open mind, thinking outside the crushed boxs.

(before you ask there is no breaking the rules of thermodynamics or crystal energy)

i intend to be at the turbo expo in glascow and i dont anticipate beginning wrighting before this. Just to check that the thing does not already exist.

any one who is intrested contact me , moonhammer at hotmail dot com,

yours tom peat

sixwp February 28, 2011 12:32

Hi Tom,

Having some course experiences in industrial properties, I was wondering if you did present your invention at this expo?
The problem is: if you came up with something new (in process, materials, etc...), this may have cost you some consequent amount of money! I explain:
If you wanted to register some patents on this/those, it would be too late as you would have already presented you novelties at the expo (and therefore, those new things are free-to-use and unpatentable, now).

Regards

Orb January 31, 2012 06:35

Quote:

Originally Posted by sixwp (Post 297336)
Hi Tom,

Having some course experiences in industrial properties, I was wondering if you did present your invention at this expo?
The problem is: if you came up with something new (in process, materials, etc...), this may have cost you some consequent amount of money! I explain:
If you wanted to register some patents on this/those, it would be too late as you would have already presented you novelties at the expo (and therefore, those new things are free-to-use and unpatentable, now).

Regards

You have up to a year to file in the U.S. after publicly disclosing your invention


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