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-   -   Algorithme choosing for solid part analysis of conjugate heat transfer (http://www.cfd-online.com/Forums/main/111605-algorithme-choosing-solid-part-analysis-conjugate-heat-transfer.html)

Anna Tian January 10, 2013 18:13

Algorithme choosing for solid part analysis of conjugate heat transfer
 
Hi,

I currently need to do the conjugate heat transfer. So I will simulate the solid part and the fluid part at the same time. I will choose FVM for fluid part. But I have no idea about whether I should choose FEM or FVM for the solid part.

May I ask how's FEM compared with FVM in this case? Any advantages? Disadvantages? Any paper suggestion for this?

Rami January 14, 2013 04:29

Hi Anna,

Not clear whether you wish to write your own code. Also not sure if you mean having a single coupled code or two codes (one for the solid and one for the fluid) running separately and exchanging relevant data at interfaces.

If you wish to write a single code of your own, the easiest way for a beginner is the FVM formulation for both the fluid and the solid, having common nodes at interfaces.

FEM is slightly more difficult, especially for fluid flow. I must confess I personally prefer it for being more consistent (i.e., make fewer assumptions and approximations) and being easier to carry over to higher orders if needed.

I hope I answered your queries in some way.

Rami

Anna Tian January 20, 2013 12:24

Thanks for your answer. I'm not gonna to write my own code. I'll use a commercial software like CFX. My question is how to decide whether to choose FEM or FVM for the solid part?

Why we don't use FVM for the solid mechanics analysis? Is there any other reason besides mesh generation difficulty?

Thank you.



Quote:

Originally Posted by Rami (Post 401675)
Hi Anna,

Not clear whether you wish to write your own code. Also not sure if you mean having a single coupled code or two codes (one for the solid and one for the fluid) running separately and exchanging relevant data at interfaces.

If you wish to write a single code of your own, the easiest way for a beginner is the FVM formulation for both the fluid and the solid, having common nodes at interfaces.

FEM is slightly more difficult, especially for fluid flow. I must confess I personally prefer it for being more consistent (i.e., make fewer assumptions and approximations) and being easier to carry over to higher orders if needed.

I hope I answered your queries in some way.

Rami


cdegroot January 20, 2013 13:42

If you are using a commercial code, just use it as is. For example, you mentioned CFX. CFX has CHT capabilities, so you can just go ahead and run your problem. Of course you will want to know if it is going a good job, so you will have to do some validation.

Anna Tian January 20, 2013 17:11

Quote:

Originally Posted by cdegroot (Post 402965)
If you are using a commercial code, just use it as is. For example, you mentioned CFX. CFX has CHT capabilities, so you can just go ahead and run your problem. Of course you will want to know if it is going a good job, so you will have to do some validation.

Can you tell me how's FVM compared with FEM for pure solid mechanics analysis? Why FVM is not as popular as FEM? Any other reason besides mesh generation time cost?


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