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-   -   CFD's three pillars in math, computer science and mechanics (http://www.cfd-online.com/Forums/main/112041-cfds-three-pillars-math-computer-science-mechanics.html)

pyroknife January 21, 2013 03:42

CFD's three pillars in math, computer science and mechanics
 
On wiki, it stated CFD's three pillars are in math, computer science and mechanics.

How true is that?

cfdnewbie January 21, 2013 03:44

It is true ....what's the reason for your question??

pyroknife January 21, 2013 03:48

Quote:

Originally Posted by cfdnewbie (Post 403028)
It is true ....what's the reason for your question??

I was just curious. I'm an undergrad considering going into CFD. Those areas are my stronger areas.

cfdnewbie January 21, 2013 03:50

you will need a solid education in fluid mechanics then, plus some good math skills. and don't be afraid to program, and learn C or Fortran. Good luck!

pyroknife January 21, 2013 04:25

Quote:

Originally Posted by cfdnewbie (Post 403030)
you will need a solid education in fluid mechanics then, plus some good math skills. and don't be afraid to program, and learn C or Fortran. Good luck!

Thanks. I love fluid mechanics, it's definitely my fav area.
Isn't matlab conmonly used in CFD?

You said C 'or' fortran. Is learning both better or would just one be enough?

cfdnewbie January 21, 2013 05:12

Matlab is a very useful tools for trying out new stuff in 1 (or max. 2) dimension, and it is nice to do quick visualizations and such. But it is no good for real 3D.
Matlab is a smal model turbine that lets you try out different configurations and learn the basics, but if you want to propel a fighter, you need a real engine ;)

Either Fortran or C is fine, research codes tend to be written in Fortran (exceptions exists, of course), while commercial codes are more C based. But the important thing is that you learn a real programming language suitable for HPC!

pyroknife January 25, 2013 19:43

Quote:

Originally Posted by cfdnewbie (Post 403044)
Matlab is a very useful tools for trying out new stuff in 1 (or max. 2) dimension, and it is nice to do quick visualizations and such. But it is no good for real 3D.
Matlab is a smal model turbine that lets you try out different configurations and learn the basics, but if you want to propel a fighter, you need a real engine ;)

Either Fortran or C is fine, research codes tend to be written in Fortran (exceptions exists, of course), while commercial codes are more C based. But the important thing is that you learn a real programming language suitable for HPC!

Hey, you posted in my thread:CFD's three pillars in math, computer science and mechanics

Sorry, I forgot to check back.


I am planning on doing research in CFD for grad school. I saw that you stated Fortran is mainly used for research codes and C is mainly used for commercial codes. From what I understand, research in CFD is revolves more around generating the code rather than a pre-generated (commercial?) code's application

Is knowledge of both languages (Fortran and C) necessary? Or is knowing one of the 2 sufficient for research based projects?

A professor at a lab I want to work at says they use Fortran and C, but I'm not sure if that implies both or one of the 2.

Thank you!

cfdnewbie January 26, 2013 07:11

One language should be sufficient, once you understand the concept of procedural programming, you should be fine. I prefer Fortran, but that's just a personal opinion.

pyroknife January 28, 2013 00:12

Quote:

Originally Posted by cfdnewbie (Post 404160)
One language should be sufficient, once you understand the concept of procedural programming, you should be fine. I prefer Fortran, but that's just a personal opinion.

It wouldn't hurt knowing more. I know some university labs prefer Fortran/C++.
Would it take long to learn C++ if you already know C?

In a class I'm taking this semester, they will be teaching some language called PICBasic. I'm not sure how similar this is to BASIC. I heard Fortran should take too long to learn if you know BASIC.


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