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Old   March 25, 2009, 06:48
Default New open source solver
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What would be necessary to develop a:


Parallel Coupled (fully-implicit) compressible unstructured non-isothermal non-Newtonian multi-phase (n phases) flow solver?


Code: Object-oriented C++
Rigorous unit testing and version control.
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Old   March 25, 2009, 10:57
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Unix (Linux, Mac or FreeBSD).
gcc 4.x.x
g++ 4.x.x
gsl (Gnu scientific library)
BLAS, LAPACK (C++ versions)
OpenMP
MPI
git for version control
===============================
1. To many open source codes lack proper documentation, a first step will be to write down a short presentation of the theory you will implement in the code.

2. Document well the code.

3. Prepare a set of simple tutorials.

4. Use standard C++ as much as possible.

Hope this will be helpfull.
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Old   March 25, 2009, 11:07
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I agree. There should be emphasis on unit testing and documentation. Code documentation and user manuals.

Git or Mercurial seem to be the best now.

Also several numerical schemes would have be tested before implementation. Don't you think? Maybe there is a library missing which could do this. Such as a object-oriented library to calculate divergence, gradient, etc.
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Old   March 25, 2009, 11:14
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I never used it, but I've heard only good things about OpenFoam, maybe you can use this for differential operators (only second order when I've checked the documentation).
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Old   March 25, 2009, 12:51
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Nope - not a good fit. In order to do a good job with a density-based solver in OpenFOAM, (and block coupled pressure-based at the same time, why not?), you really want to write the discretisation differently. This is because of cross-field coupling: we still want rho, U, E etc to be self-contained fields but the matrix must be closely coupled.

However, the mesh, geometric field, linear solver, boundary conditions etc. classes can be re-used in full.
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Old   March 25, 2009, 12:57
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Wouldn't you also have to solve the non-linearity of Navier-Stokes equations using for example a Newton's based solver?
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