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-   -   MSc in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) (http://www.cfd-online.com/Forums/main/74975-msc-computational-fluid-dynamics-cfd.html)

jejo April 13, 2010 12:00

MSc in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD)
 
Which universities in:

a) UK,
b) Canada or USA, and/ or
c) Europe

...would you recommend I consider to study an MSc in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD)? :rolleyes:

Your responses would be very gratefully received. :):D;)

vishyaroon April 13, 2010 16:52

Hello Jejo,

A lot depends on what you want to specialize in (even in CFD). For eg. numerical methods, CFD applications etc. Some universities with reputed CFD professors are (the list is not complete and please consider other's suggestions too):

Stanford
Univ Illinois, Urbana Champaign
Univ. Maryland
Purdue University
Georgia Tech
LSU

Sorry, but cannot leave out my alma mater(s)
Arizona State
Virginia Tech

Apart from the Mechanical Engineering departments in the universities, I'd recommend looking at Aerospace, Engineering Mechanics and in some cases even the Maths department to find good work in CFD. I took more CFD courses in other departments than from Mechanical Engineering departments in my schools.

Michiel April 14, 2010 07:04

In the Netherlands you can look at TU Eindhoven; http://www.fluid.tue.nl/
TU Delft and TU Twente are also active with fluid dynamics.

jejo April 14, 2010 15:28

Thank you
 
Thank you both for the information. :) It's helped me. I'll keep researching.

It seems it costs a lot for an international student in USA. So I might have to study in my home country, UK.

jejo April 14, 2010 15:31

Thank you! I really love the text on that page http://www.fluid.tue.nl/ regarding the scale of some lengths and times of different events from flies wings to galaxies.

puga April 15, 2010 07:39

I'm not sure a degree in CFD is such a good idea. It's awfully specialized, and limits what kinds of jobs one might be eligible for. You're better off getting a degree in mechanical (or aerospace, if you must), and specializing in CFD/fluid flow therein.

jejo April 15, 2010 08:11

Thanks puga. I have a degree in Applied Physics already and 20 years in IT. I want to specialise in CFD through a Master's degree.

puga April 15, 2010 08:18

Sorry about that. I made the false assumption that you were an engineering student.

acampbell April 15, 2010 18:39

In the UK try the University of Greenwich and University of Swansea.


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