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How to detect area of separation by looking at streamlines ?

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Old   April 21, 2011, 02:50
Smile How to detect area of separation by looking at streamlines ?
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mohammad
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Hi everybody...
My question is after I solve a rotary wing ( wind turbine) and I see the streamlines on the suction surface, how can I understand which part is separated and which part is still attached flow?For example in the attached file which shows the streamlines on the suction surface of a wind turbine blade, can I say that "A" is area of separation and "B" is still attached?
What about "D" and "E" zones?

if so, then the whole area of "C" is fully attached??

please help me to understand it??

Thanks
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Last edited by mohammad; April 21, 2011 at 03:05.
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Old   April 23, 2011, 03:11
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Raashid Baig
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mohammad View Post
Hi everybody...
My question is after I solve a rotary wing ( wind turbine) and I see the streamlines on the suction surface, how can I understand which part is separated and which part is still attached flow?For example in the attached file which shows the streamlines on the suction surface of a wind turbine blade, can I say that "A" is area of separation and "B" is still attached?
What about "D" and "E" zones?

if so, then the whole area of "C" is fully attached??

please help me to understand it??

Thanks
hi Mohammed,
What you are saying is absolutely correct "C" is fully attached. "B" is attached while "A" is separated. "D" and "E" are completely separated. People generally plot these surface streamlines with Surface pressure and show then in Front, Back view so that they get a clearer picture of the flow physics.
Raashid
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Old   April 26, 2011, 08:28
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Originally Posted by cfd_newbie View Post
hi Mohammed,
What you are saying is absolutely correct "C" is fully attached. "B" is attached while "A" is separated. "D" and "E" are completely separated. People generally plot these surface streamlines with Surface pressure and show then in Front, Back view so that they get a clearer picture of the flow physics.
Raashid
Dear Raashid,
Thanks a lot for your help.
One other Question is that which pressure should I use to present the existence of separation....Shear or Normal pressure( stress)?

Tnx buddy.
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