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-   -   What is the best resource (book) to start learning about CFD? (http://www.cfd-online.com/Forums/main/88047-what-best-resource-book-start-learning-about-cfd.html)

mahill May 6, 2011 14:29

What is the best resource (book) to start learning about CFD?
 
I see there are a lot of resources available at http://www.cfd-online.com/Books/ . But I've become a bit overwhelmed with the amount of material that's available. I have a pretty limited experience with CFD. I was doing a research project this semester (last semester at Purdue!) and I had to basically teach myself CFX. Yes, I've learned a little bit about how to use the software, but I don't have real knowledge about how it actually works. What I'm looking for is perhaps a "golden standard" text to get me started on how CFD works (and explains different models like....k-omega, SST, etc.). When I was doing my project, I would basically have to take the professor's and others' words for it when they suggested a certain turbulance model. I've read the CFX documentation, but information really isn't presented well for someone with no real knowledge of the inner-workings of CFD.

Thomas_L May 6, 2011 14:57

Mahill,

If you want a good book who explains Turbulent models and the differences, I like "Turbulent Flow, S.B. Pope".
http://eccentric.mae.cornell.edu/~po...lentFlows.html


A general introduction will be for me "Computational Techniques for Fluid Dynamics, Vol. 1 and Vol 2 by C.A. Fletcher"

Thomas_L

mahill May 6, 2011 15:03

Quote:

Originally Posted by Thomas_L (Post 306532)
Mahill,

If you want a good book who explains Turbulent models and the differences, I like "Turbulent Flow, S.B. Pope".
http://eccentric.mae.cornell.edu/~pope/TurbulentFlows.html


A general introduction will be for me "Computational Techniques for Fluid Dynamics, Vol. 1 and Vol 2 by C.A. Fletcher"

Thomas_L

Thanks, I'll take a look at these. I'm kinda disappointed with myself that I didn't get interested in CFD until my senior year. I never got to take a proper class in it. I think when I eventually get to grad school, I want to work in CFD. Oddly enough, my undergrad studies mainly focused on Astronautical propulsion, but CFD still plays an important role. What has me interested is being able to target your GPU for CFD calculations, which can be over 20-30 times faster than your CPU. If you had a couple pretty powerful GPUs running in SLI, you could effectively have your own supercomputer for less than $1000.

sail May 6, 2011 17:11

Quote:

Originally Posted by mahill (Post 306535)
Thanks, I'll take a look at these. I'm kinda disappointed with myself that I didn't get interested in CFD until my senior year. I never got to take a proper class in it. I think when I eventually get to grad school, I want to work in CFD. Oddly enough, my undergrad studies mainly focused on Astronautical propulsion, but CFD still plays an important role. What has me interested is being able to target your GPU for CFD calculations, which can be over 20-30 times faster than your CPU. If you had a couple pretty powerful GPUs running in SLI, you could effectively have your own supercomputer for less than $1000.

is not so easy as it seems, but it is certanly a interesting field.:)

arjun May 6, 2011 17:38

Quote:

Originally Posted by mahill (Post 306535)
Thanks, I'll take a look at these. I'm kinda disappointed with myself that I didn't get interested in CFD until my senior year. I never got to take a proper class in it. I think when I eventually get to grad school, I want to work in CFD. Oddly enough, my undergrad studies mainly focused on Astronautical propulsion, but CFD still plays an important role. What has me interested is being able to target your GPU for CFD calculations, which can be over 20-30 times faster than your CPU. If you had a couple pretty powerful GPUs running in SLI, you could effectively have your own supercomputer for less than $1000.


I never did a single course in CFD during my graduation. Whatever I learned is self taught.
I do have a normal CFD solver : navier.com
And a working navier stokes solver with GPU. ( not available to download though) :-)

You can learn yourself too, just need to do little bit of hardwork.


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