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Best book about Turbulence models

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Old   June 4, 2005, 08:40
Default Best book about Turbulence models
  #1
Michele Spinolo
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Hi Guys,

I am looking for a nice book which presents an overview of turbulence models (k-epsilon, RSM, LES possibly DES and DNS too) with both a theory overview and practical application overview (i.e. examples which a model fails to predict, or which it predicts correctly). it would be the best if both compressible and uncompressible cases were presented.

I had a look to books list and reviews on this site, but I could not find what I am looking for.

Thanks for help in advance! Michele
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Old   June 4, 2005, 10:32
Default Re: Best book about Turbulence models
  #2
noName
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Very comprehensive and easy to read: Turbulent Flows by Stephen B. Pope

Not so comprehensive, introductory and a bit dated, but very readable: Turbulence Modeling for Cfd by David C. Wilcox

I can add several more to this list, but I'd rather stick to my top two favorites...
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Old   June 4, 2005, 11:24
Default Laval Nozzle flow
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john
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Does anyone simulate the true 2D or 3D de Laval nozzle? Does the result approach the position of the shock of quasi-one-dimension model?
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Old   June 6, 2005, 13:58
Default Re: Laval Nozzle flow
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Mani
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Yes, it should and does. Why are you asking?
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Old   June 7, 2005, 04:23
Default Re: Best book about Turbulence models
  #5
Halim
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"Closure Strategies for Turbulent and Transitional Flows' Edited by B. E. Launder and N. D. Sandham, Cambridge University Press, 2002.

This is the most comprehensive turbulent modeling book I ever see.
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Old   June 7, 2005, 05:50
Default Re: Best book about Turbulence models
  #6
edi
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Ciao Michele,

I personally appreciated the one by Wilcox. It's very easy to understand and CFD-oriented, but it's true: it's a bit dated (1993/1994) and DNS and LES are defined as "new horizons"...

In bocca al lupo

Edi.
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Old   June 8, 2005, 05:04
Default to Mani
  #7
john
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Dear Mani,

Have you ever do the simulation of 2d or 3d laval nozzle? I want to know more details of the results. thank you!

john
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Old   June 8, 2005, 16:35
Default Re: to Mani
  #8
Mani
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John,

yes, I have. What exactly do you want to know? Regarding the shock position, I generally find pretty good agreement between the inviscid 2D/3D flow and the quasi-1D theory. Of course, this will somewhat depend on the nozzle shape, i.e. it depends on how significant the cross-sectional variations are. What is the problem you have?
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