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-   -   lagrangian solid particle tracking - OFv2.1 (http://www.cfd-online.com/Forums/openfoam-programming-development/99418-lagrangian-solid-particle-tracking-ofv2-1-a.html)

PelusDadidus April 3, 2012 07:08

lagrangian solid particle tracking - OFv2.1
 
Hello,

I'm using OpenFOAM v2.1 and I would like to visualize solid particle movements inside water tank. I would like to do it in a simple way, only one-way coupling would be needed (low concentration of small particles), and particle injection at the inlet of the tank
I tried to use some solvers available on the internet but none of them is working. I know only basic C++ and I'm not able to create my own solver, even if it may look simple for you.
Does anyone know a simple way to visualize solid particle movements with OpenFOAM 2.1 ?

Thanks in advance

Ameya T August 20, 2015 14:53

Sorry for restarting this thread but were you successful in finding a solver? I am interested in knowing it.

ali_atrian August 21, 2015 02:20

you can work with DPMFoam in OF2.3.0 or OF2.2.x
this solver considers two phases of water and solid and track the movement of them:
http://www.openfoam.org/version2.3.0/dpm.php

Ameya T August 21, 2015 02:26

Hi Ali,

I had a look at DPMFoam, but from its description it seems that it handles compressible fluids and solids and not incompressible fluids and solids which I want to work with.

ali_atrian August 21, 2015 03:08

DPMFoam is a Transient solver for the coupled transport of a single kinematic particle cloud including the effect of the volume fraction of particles on the
incompresible continuous phase.:

as in transportProp we have:
Code:

    transportModel  Newtonian;
    contiuousPhaseName water;
    nu                    1.07e-06;
    rho.water            998.707;

and it includes:
#include "PhaseIncompressibleTurbulenceModel.H"

Ameya T August 21, 2015 03:54

Hi,
Is this the Goldschmidt tutorial you are referring to? As in that properties of air are mentioned.

ali_atrian August 21, 2015 06:32

this is not from "Goldschmidt"
but "Goldschmidt" is the same as what i wrote but for air and no other difference

Ameya T August 21, 2015 09:05

Thanks Ali for the clarification


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