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Old   January 19, 2012, 12:10
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plm
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Hi all,

From what I understand about LES wall functions, in order to use nuSgsWallFunction you should have a y+ > 30 which places your first computational cell away from the wall within the inertial sublayer....

My question is... does the wall function take into account if you have a y+ < 30 (i.e. your grid is finer 'than necessary' near the wall)? Couldn't Spaldings law (which I understand is the assumption made for the nuSgsWallFunction) just be extended to adjacent cells up to those cells which have the value of y+ required?
Hope this question makes sense....

Also, what are the alternatives to this wall function in OpenFOAM?

Hope someone can help. Thanks for your time.
Cheers,
plm
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Old   January 21, 2012, 13:14
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plm
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Any ideas anyone?
Does anyone have experience with LES wall functions for low y+?

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