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Old   July 26, 2006, 22:10
Default Looking for a CFD textbook
  #1
Alex
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Hi there.

I am looking for a comprehensive CFD textbook, that goes from the basics to the state-of-the-art, including 3D computations.

I would like something that preferably is written in english and mathematish, and not Saturnian or martian

So far, I have my eyes set on Chung's book, Computational Fluid Mechanics, Ferziger's book, Computational Methods for Fluid Mechanics,

Fundamentals of Computational Fluid Dynamics, by Pulliam and Lomax

and lastly CFD: Principles and Applications by Blazek

There really seems to be a lot out there, and since I'll probably end up spending a thousand hours killing brain cells on this, I would appreciate a heads up on what is the best text out there.

thanx

Alex
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Old   July 27, 2006, 04:04
Default Re: Looking for a CFD textbook
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mar
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Depending on your specifical interest many books are available.

CFD is a large subject.

If you are a "developer" or a "user" things are quite different.

so it is preferable to better specify your interest and not look for "a comprehensive CFD textbook".

Anyway if you are a "developer" of compressible - Euler / Navier Stokes equations. I think that the best book is:

Charles Hirsch Numerical computation of internal and external ows, Vol 2 John Wiley & Sons.

You can find it used on the web I think. Hi

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Old   July 27, 2006, 04:06
Default Re: Looking for a CFD textbook
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KK.Khan
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For begginner of CFD, in my opinion is comparitively better than the other, Ferziger's book, Computational Methods for Fluid Mechanics

The Book Computational fluid Dynamics vol I by Klaus A. Hoffmann and Chiang is also a good choice .

you can try

cheer KK.Kkan
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Old   July 27, 2006, 04:15
Default Re: Looking for a CFD textbook
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Gerrit
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If you really want to understand what happens with CFD in your computer, I think that Hoffmann as mentioned by Khan is a very good start. Before starting to program however, I think you need to read a second book as Hoffmann maybe outdated according to many CFD people, because it's all about finite differences and so on.

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Old   July 27, 2006, 04:33
Default Re: Looking for a CFD textbook
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Ford Prefect
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Perhaps not state-of-the-art but written in an engineering language that is really easy to grasp:

"Computational Fluid Dynamics: The Basics with Applications", by Andersson (have a look under books on this site)

If you are looking for a book with much code examples (FORTRAN) then check out:

"Computational Techniques for Fluid Dynamics", by C.A.J. Fletcher

On the subject of Transport Phenomena:

"Transport Phenomena", by R.B. Bird, W.E. Stewart and E.N. Lightfoot
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Old   July 27, 2006, 14:11
Default Re: Looking for a CFD textbook
  #6
yong
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Yes, as other mentioned, there is no perfect book for CFD ppl of differnt level. One book I highly recommand for ppl with the basic CFD/NA knowledge:

Computational methods for fluid dynamics by J.H.Ferziger and M.Peric

There are some example FORTRAN codes (developped by Peric) available from Springer's ftp
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Old   July 27, 2006, 14:54
Default Re: Looking for a CFD textbook
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Alex
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Thanx for the responses.

Yeah, I am aware that CFD is a broad subject.

I wast interested in a book that could expose me to as many different topics in CFD as possible, and make me a well-read person, so when someone mentions Adams-Moulton scheme, I know what they are talking about, as apposed to a book that just covers say the more common Euler and Kutta methods.

Chung's book seemed intereesting because first of all it's huge, it's got a lot in there, and it addresses not only finite diff, but also finite vol and finite element. He says it's useful to be able to compare and know all 3 and see how they are linked or how they differ. But I've read some reviews that it's a huge tome with very little pictures and just a lot of stuff thrown at you with very little space in between.

On the other, everywhere I look they talk about this new book that Fluen Inc. contributed to, and that comes optionally with LabFlow software, and that has a ton of illustrations, very clearly written, 1600 problems etc.

I guess I'm looking for a book that covers the basics in detail, and yet also has room for more advanced topics like handling 3D computations. I also really would like to see some examples and applications (codes woudl be nice).

I have Hoffman's Numerical Methods for Engineers and Scientist book, and it's really really good. So I'll have a look at his CFD book too, even I do look for something recent, as CFD is changing and growing quite rapidly, especially with new computing power.

Alex
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