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Old   January 16, 2013, 07:01
Default How to start the tutorial in su2_manual?
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I also can't run the tutorial test offered in su2_manual.pdf (page 21).
I don't know how to go forward. My current condition is as following:

1. I download the Source Code named "SU2v2.0" and the "TestCases"

2. I setup the file named "Setup-Windows-x86.exe" in the directory: SU2v2.0\trunk\bin\Windows\32-bit\. The setup path is C:\Program Files\Stanford ADL\SU^2

3. I setup the file named "w_ccompxe_redist_ia32_2013.1.119.msi" in the directory:C:\Program Files\Stanford ADL\SU^2\Intel.

4. Then I open the su2_manual and find the Chapter 3 "Quick Start Tutorial" . I find that:

"Again, it is assumed that you have already obtained and compiled
the SU2 CFD code (either individually, or as part of the complete SU2 package) for a serial computation."

"Move to the directory containing the compiled executable of SU2 CFD (serial version). If you built the
code with the build SU2.py script, SU2 CFD can be found in the SU2/SU2Py/directory. Copy the cong le
(inv NACA0012.cfg) and the mesh le (mesh NACA0012 inv.su2) to this directory. Run the executable by
entering "./SU2 CFD inv NACA0012.cfg" at the command line."


I have installed the Microsoft Visual Studio 2008 (containing C++). I don't know what does those mentioned above mean. I don't know where is the command line and how to find the "compiled executable of SU2 CFD(serial version)". I even don't know how to compile the SU2 CFD. In one word, I have little knowledge about C++ compilation. In addition, I find it is better to use console for win7. I don't know what is console. Is it the DOS window(black screen)?

I want some help in detail.

Last edited by sxhqjfl; January 16, 2013 at 11:04.
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Old   January 18, 2013, 11:09
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Abhilash J Markkassery
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Hi sxhqjfl,

I would suggest you start from scratch. You do not need the source code for windows (and compiling on windows is a pain, as SU2 does not yet have Visual Studio .sln file to compile out of.)

Please go to http://su2.stanford.edu/download.html, click "register and download", fill out the form and download the correct version that you want to use (Serial/Parallel and x86/x64). I would suggest a serial version to start out with, because there is a need for more installations with a parallel build.

Next install it on your computer (just as you would any Windows installer.) Then go to the installation folder (If you did not change the path, it should be - C:\Program Files (x86)\Stanford ADL\SU2\ if you're running a 64 bit machine, or it should be C:\Program Files\Stanford ADL\SU2\ if running a 32 bit machine.

Go to the Intel folder and install the the program in that folder. (w_ccompxe_.......msi) and then if you have downloaded the parallel build you might need to download OpenMPI and/or MPICH2 1.4.1 and install it to get your build to work right.

Once you have done these the installation is done.

Then follow the quick start tutorial at http://adl.stanford.edu/docs/display...Start+Tutorial

To be a real quick start guide to just see it function, download the config and mesh file. Place them in the bin directory of your install (for example, C:\Program Files (x86)\Stanford ADL\SU2\bin\) and then open up command prompt (Start>>All Programs>>Accessories>>Command Prompt) and then change your working directory to the bin folder. For example by:
cd "C:\Program Files (x86)\Stanford ADL\SU2\bin\"
and then typing the following command (the program followed by the configuration file)
SU2_CFD inv_NACA0012.cfg
You will have the solution in the bin folder (by default all solution will be in the Tecplot format) Follow instructions in the Quick-Start webpage to change the file format to Paraview and anything lse that you might want to try out.

Hope this helps.
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Old   January 18, 2013, 21:10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by amarkkassery View Post
Hi sxhqjfl,

I would suggest you start from scratch. You do not need the source code for windows (and compiling on windows is a pain, as SU2 does not yet have Visual Studio .sln file to compile out of.)

Please go to http://su2.stanford.edu/download.html, click "register and download", fill out the form and download the correct version that you want to use (Serial/Parallel and x86/x64). I would suggest a serial version to start out with, because there is a need for more installations with a parallel build.

Next install it on your computer (just as you would any Windows installer.) Then go to the installation folder (If you did not change the path, it should be - C:\Program Files (x86)\Stanford ADL\SU2\ if you're running a 64 bit machine, or it should be C:\Program Files\Stanford ADL\SU2\ if running a 32 bit machine.

Go to the Intel folder and install the the program in that folder. (w_ccompxe_.......msi) and then if you have downloaded the parallel build you might need to download OpenMPI and/or MPICH2 1.4.1 and install it to get your build to work right.

Once you have done these the installation is done.

Then follow the quick start tutorial at http://adl.stanford.edu/docs/display...Start+Tutorial

To be a real quick start guide to just see it function, download the config and mesh file. Place them in the bin directory of your install (for example, C:\Program Files (x86)\Stanford ADL\SU2\bin\) and then open up command prompt (Start>>All Programs>>Accessories>>Command Prompt) and then change your working directory to the bin folder. For example by:
cd "C:\Program Files (x86)\Stanford ADL\SU2\bin\"
and then typing the following command (the program followed by the configuration file)
SU2_CFD inv_NACA0012.cfg
You will have the solution in the bin folder (by default all solution will be in the Tecplot format) Follow instructions in the Quick-Start webpage to change the file format to Paraview and anything lse that you might want to try out.

Hope this helps.
Thank you very much! I have done like you said and get the .plt files. I don't know if I want to use the Source Code, what should I do? I think the most difficult thing is compilation. If I can't use the Visual Studio, should I download a C++ compiler? How should I do step by step?
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Old   January 18, 2013, 22:41
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Abhilash J Markkassery
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sxhqjfl View Post
Thank you very much! I have done like you said and get the .plt files. I don't know if I want to use the Source Code, what should I do? I think the most difficult thing is compilation. If I can't use the Visual Studio, should I download a C++ compiler? How should I do step by step?
Well you don't really have to use the source code for windows, unless you plan on changing up something or adding your own methods (or other methods that the solver doesn't have as yet.) The binary for windows is a complete compilation of everything you need and it comes with the most current versions of all libraries (that SU^2 currently supports).

I would suggest you use the binary until you have plans to better the software. Once you get there, I would suggest either running a virtual machine with linux, a dual boot linux machine, or a dedicated linux box. It is so much easier to compile and run on linux than it is on windows, because of all the dependencies that needs to be installed.

If you want help installing on a linux machine, you could refer: http://adl.stanford.edu/docs/display...on+from+Source

To install Linux, I would suggest using Ubuntu (http://www.ubuntu.com/download/deskt...dows-installer) for dual booting from windows. It automatically takes care of all the boot sectors and everything else. If something goes wrong, log into windows and uninstall linux.... as simple as that.
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Old   January 20, 2013, 20:12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by amarkkassery View Post
Well you don't really have to use the source code for windows, unless you plan on changing up something or adding your own methods (or other methods that the solver doesn't have as yet.) The binary for windows is a complete compilation of everything you need and it comes with the most current versions of all libraries (that SU^2 currently supports).

I would suggest you use the binary until you have plans to better the software. Once you get there, I would suggest either running a virtual machine with linux, a dual boot linux machine, or a dedicated linux box. It is so much easier to compile and run on linux than it is on windows, because of all the dependencies that needs to be installed.

If you want help installing on a linux machine, you could refer: http://adl.stanford.edu/docs/display...on+from+Source

To install Linux, I would suggest using Ubuntu (http://www.ubuntu.com/download/deskt...dows-installer) for dual booting from windows. It automatically takes care of all the boot sectors and everything else. If something goes wrong, log into windows and uninstall linux.... as simple as that.
Thank you for your reply. I am a graduate student and want to add some new methods to SU^2. However, I have no experience on Linux. I find MINGW and Cygwin can work as gcc compiler in windows OS. Is it can compile the SU^2 ?
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Old   January 20, 2013, 22:22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sxhqjfl View Post
Thank you for your reply. I am a graduate student and want to add some new methods to SU^2. However, I have no experience on Linux. I find MINGW and Cygwin can work as gcc compiler in windows OS. Is it can compile the SU^2 ?
To add new methods, please go over the developers documentation at http://su2.stanford.edu/doxygen.html and http://adl.stanford.edu/docs/display...oper%27s+Guide
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