CFD Online Logo CFD Online URL
www.cfd-online.com
[Sponsors]
Home > Forums > Main CFD Forum

Hot topics in CFD research?

Register Blogs Members List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Like Tree6Likes
  • 5 Post By lex78700
  • 1 Post By DaveyBaby

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old   June 1, 2014, 09:45
Default Hot topics in CFD research?
  #1
New Member
 
Hamed
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 13
Rep Power: 6
aroma is on a distinguished road
Hi folks,

Does anybody have any idea about hot topics for research in CFD related studies? How can one find a topic to research on for instance for his/her PhD?

Are Fluid Structure Interaction, Turbulence or Aerodynamics still topic-of-interest?
I appreciate if any PhD student or Prof can help me.

Thanks in advance.
Aroma
aroma is offline   Reply With Quote

Old   June 10, 2014, 15:41
Default
  #2
New Member
 
Adrien
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Cambridge, UK
Posts: 17
Rep Power: 4
lex78700 is on a distinguished road
Hi Aroma,

Your question is so general that it is hard to answer. Most PhD students find a topic that they are excited about after their Master's courses and thesis. During that time, you attend many classes by professors who are themselves doing research in a particular field, and during your thesis you start reading the fluid dynamics literature to get a feeling of some active areas of research.

The topics you mentionned are for sure very hot topics! To get some other names you can browse the two most popular general fluid mechanics research journals: Physics of Fluids (http://scitation.aip.org/content/aip/journal/pof2) and Journal of Fluid Mechanics (http://journals.cambridge.org/action...ournal?jid=FLM). After a very quick search in the latest publications of Physics of Fluids I get the following topics:

- Laminar Flows
(classical theory of fluid dynamics, but still very active and beautiful area)

- Instability and Transition
(why some analytical solutions are not observed in nature, why many flows are very sensitive to perturbations are go unstable)

- Turbulent Flows
(a state of flow with high disorder, very good mixing properties and which is omnipresent at the human scale and crucial for most engineering applications but so poorly understood)

- Compressible Flows
(when the velocities are very high and shock waves can appear, involving a lot of thermodynamics)

- Geophysical Flows
(flows on large scales where the Earth rotation matters or fluids with varying density such as the atmosphere or ocean)

- Biofluid Mechanics
(fascinating topics from the locomotion of animals or microbes to the fluid functions of living cells to the blood flowing in your veins or air through your lungs. Some people even study the influence of fluid flows in morphogenesis, that is the way an embryo and all the organs of a living being are formed. After all life wouldn't be possible without fluids!)

- Micro- and Nanofluid Mechanics
(flows at very very small scales where counterintuitive forces arise, with a lot of exciting technological applications)

- Interfacial Flows
(flows involving interfaces such as bubbles or drops, where surface tension is crucial. Lots of everyday life applications as well)

- Viscous and Non-Newtonian Flows
(flow where viscosity is dominant over inertia and fluids with complex rheology properties such as ketchup, toothpaste, cosmetics, concrete, lava, mud or moving sands. Many environmental and industrial applications!)

- Particulate, Multiphase, and Granular Flows
(flows with small particles inside or different phases such as a mix of liquid/gas in sodas or clouds or liquid/solid in sediments in the ocean or mud or even solid/gas in sand dunes or sand storms!)

Among them, turbulence is honestly the topic counting the largest number of publications. In that sense, it is one of the most "active" areas of research. It is a very important phenomenon from an engineering and fundamental viewpoint, that is described by very well known equations but that is still very poorly understood, so that's why people are putting much effort.

Of course there are many other "topics" such as Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics, Aerodynamics, Naval Hydrodynamics, Meteorology and Oceanography, Aeroacoustics, Fluid Structure Interactions etc... But I guess you can always more or less fit them in some of the previously given "academic" categories: the first can be a mix of geophysical flows/instability and transition/compressible flows, while the second and the third are a mix of instability and transition/turbulence/laminar flow/compressible flows etc... More specific or "applied" research journals can give you an idea of these more "specialized" fields.

Don't hesitate if you have more questions!

Adrien

Last edited by lex78700; June 10, 2014 at 17:20.
lex78700 is offline   Reply With Quote

Old   June 11, 2014, 06:19
Default Look for the funding
  #3
Member
 
DaveyBaby
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 46
Rep Power: 5
DaveyBaby is on a distinguished road
Hi!
I would recommend looking at university websites, and searching PhD topics by faculty. You should look through Aeronautics, Mechanical Engineering, Applied Maths etc etc faculties. Most of them will probably have some specific projects advertised, and these will be funded most importantly!
aroma likes this.
DaveyBaby is offline   Reply With Quote

Old   July 24, 2014, 22:51
Thumbs up
  #4
New Member
 
Hamed
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 13
Rep Power: 6
aroma is on a distinguished road
Thank you both for your time and helpful advice. I am mostly interested in VIV and DNS in turbulent flow. I will follow one of these two topics.
Thanks again for your help.
aroma is offline   Reply With Quote

Old   July 29, 2014, 05:51
Default how to post new thread??
  #5
New Member
 
pratik
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: pune
Posts: 15
Rep Power: 4
pratik khandelwal is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by aroma View Post
Thank you both for your time and helpful advice. I am mostly interested in VIV and DNS in turbulent flow. I will follow one of these two topics.
Thanks again for your help.
i m new user will u plz help me ??
pratik khandelwal is offline   Reply With Quote

Old   July 29, 2014, 16:28
Default
  #6
New Member
 
Hamed
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 13
Rep Power: 6
aroma is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by pratik khandelwal View Post
i m new user will u plz help me ??
help in what?
aroma is offline   Reply With Quote

Old   August 1, 2014, 00:29
Default
  #7
New Member
 
pratik
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: pune
Posts: 15
Rep Power: 4
pratik khandelwal is on a distinguished road
do u have any tutorials regarding basics of geometry creation and meshing in gambit.... plz send me on
pratik7745@gmail.com

thank u!!!!!
pratik khandelwal is offline   Reply With Quote

Old   May 6, 2015, 15:58
Default
  #8
New Member
 
Gaurav
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: London
Posts: 5
Rep Power: 8
gaurav_bhutani is on a distinguished road
A very impressive explanation by Adrien

Quote:
Originally Posted by lex78700 View Post
Hi Aroma,

Your question is so general that it is hard to answer. Most PhD students find a topic that they are excited about after their Master's courses and thesis. During that time, you attend many classes by professors who are themselves doing research in a particular field, and during your thesis you start reading the fluid dynamics literature to get a feeling of some active areas of research.

The topics you mentionned are for sure very hot topics! To get some other names you can browse the two most popular general fluid mechanics research journals: Physics of Fluids (http://scitation.aip.org/content/aip/journal/pof2) and Journal of Fluid Mechanics (http://journals.cambridge.org/action...ournal?jid=FLM). After a very quick search in the latest publications of Physics of Fluids I get the following topics:

- Laminar Flows
(classical theory of fluid dynamics, but still very active and beautiful area)

- Instability and Transition
(why some analytical solutions are not observed in nature, why many flows are very sensitive to perturbations are go unstable)

- Turbulent Flows
(a state of flow with high disorder, very good mixing properties and which is omnipresent at the human scale and crucial for most engineering applications but so poorly understood)

- Compressible Flows
(when the velocities are very high and shock waves can appear, involving a lot of thermodynamics)

- Geophysical Flows
(flows on large scales where the Earth rotation matters or fluids with varying density such as the atmosphere or ocean)

- Biofluid Mechanics
(fascinating topics from the locomotion of animals or microbes to the fluid functions of living cells to the blood flowing in your veins or air through your lungs. Some people even study the influence of fluid flows in morphogenesis, that is the way an embryo and all the organs of a living being are formed. After all life wouldn't be possible without fluids!)

- Micro- and Nanofluid Mechanics
(flows at very very small scales where counterintuitive forces arise, with a lot of exciting technological applications)

- Interfacial Flows
(flows involving interfaces such as bubbles or drops, where surface tension is crucial. Lots of everyday life applications as well)

- Viscous and Non-Newtonian Flows
(flow where viscosity is dominant over inertia and fluids with complex rheology properties such as ketchup, toothpaste, cosmetics, concrete, lava, mud or moving sands. Many environmental and industrial applications!)

- Particulate, Multiphase, and Granular Flows
(flows with small particles inside or different phases such as a mix of liquid/gas in sodas or clouds or liquid/solid in sediments in the ocean or mud or even solid/gas in sand dunes or sand storms!)

Among them, turbulence is honestly the topic counting the largest number of publications. In that sense, it is one of the most "active" areas of research. It is a very important phenomenon from an engineering and fundamental viewpoint, that is described by very well known equations but that is still very poorly understood, so that's why people are putting much effort.

Of course there are many other "topics" such as Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics, Aerodynamics, Naval Hydrodynamics, Meteorology and Oceanography, Aeroacoustics, Fluid Structure Interactions etc... But I guess you can always more or less fit them in some of the previously given "academic" categories: the first can be a mix of geophysical flows/instability and transition/compressible flows, while the second and the third are a mix of instability and transition/turbulence/laminar flow/compressible flows etc... More specific or "applied" research journals can give you an idea of these more "specialized" fields.

Don't hesitate if you have more questions!

Adrien
gaurav_bhutani is offline   Reply With Quote

Reply

Tags
cfd, phd, research

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
CFD research for grad school pyroknife Main CFD Forum 4 July 24, 2013 17:12
Top CFD research group info woboer007 Main CFD Forum 0 June 10, 2013 11:02
CFD product for wind engineering research Amer Main CFD Forum 13 July 30, 2008 09:02
prognoses shanay Main CFD Forum 12 April 2, 2003 15:46
ASME CFD Symposium - Call for Papers Chris Kleijn Main CFD Forum 0 September 25, 2001 10:17


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 13:02.