CFD Online Logo CFD Online URL
www.cfd-online.com
[Sponsors]
Home > Forums > Software User Forums > ANSYS > FLUENT > Fluent Multiphase

Rain drop (3D) falling simulation in ANSYS FLUENT

Register Blogs Members List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old   May 4, 2020, 17:20
Default Rain drop (3D) falling simulation in ANSYS FLUENT
  #1
New Member
 
Shubh
Join Date: May 2020
Posts: 11
Rep Power: 6
ShubhCFD is on a distinguished road
I want to simulate a 3D rain drop falling on the ground. I have made a 3D spherical object having a shared topology with the computational domain in Spaceclaim. But when I simulated using all necessary settings in FLUENT, I couldn't see a slight difference in the droplet it's as it is despite making sure all things are intact. I couldn't find a single tutorial for a 3D VOF problem so kinda stuck where I am making mistake. Please help me with this.
ShubhCFD is offline   Reply With Quote

Old   May 5, 2020, 04:42
Default Rain Drops
  #2
Senior Member
 
vinerm's Avatar
 
Vinerm
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Nederland
Posts: 2,946
Blog Entries: 1
Rep Power: 35
vinerm will become famous soon enough
You do not need to create a 3D rain drop in geometry. Though it could be useful but only for initialization. To model a single rain drop, you need to use Volume of Fluid model. However, it depends on the objective of the simulation. Depending upon that, it is possible that you need to use DPM instead of VOF.
__________________
Regards,
Vinerm

PM to be used if and only if you do not want something to be shared publicly. PM is considered to be of the least priority.
vinerm is offline   Reply With Quote

Old   May 5, 2020, 05:18
Default
  #3
New Member
 
Shubh
Join Date: May 2020
Posts: 11
Rep Power: 6
ShubhCFD is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by vinerm View Post
You do not need to create a 3D rain drop in geometry. Though it could be useful but only for initialization. To model a single rain drop, you need to use Volume of Fluid model. However, it depends on the objective of the simulation. Depending upon that, it is possible that you need to use DPM instead of VOF.
Yes, I am using VOF model but I wanted proceed with geometry creation as I want to add solidification/melting model to it afterwords. Hence I created two bodies one is water drop and other is air surrounding the drop
ShubhCFD is offline   Reply With Quote

Old   May 5, 2020, 05:20
Default Solidification-Melting Model
  #4
Senior Member
 
vinerm's Avatar
 
Vinerm
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Nederland
Posts: 2,946
Blog Entries: 1
Rep Power: 35
vinerm will become famous soon enough
Solidification-Melting model also does not require a separate geometric model of the shape, however, as I mentioned earlier, it helps in defining proper shape of the drop. In reality, drops are not spherical, rather shaped like tear drops with their tail pointing forward.
__________________
Regards,
Vinerm

PM to be used if and only if you do not want something to be shared publicly. PM is considered to be of the least priority.
vinerm is offline   Reply With Quote

Reply

Tags
ansys fluent 19.2, multiphase modelling, vof model

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Combustion Simulation ANSYS Fluent - There is no ignition delay Rudolf Diesel FLUENT 1 May 21, 2023 06:30
Ansys fluent PEMFC addon: Getting 0 Current during simulation?? Michael104 FLUENT 0 December 16, 2019 12:30
Fused Deposition Modeling Process Simulation in Ansys Fluent ttp262 FLUENT 0 October 2, 2018 16:07
Combustion Simulation ANSYS Fluent - There is no ignition delay Rudolf Diesel FLUENT 2 October 1, 2018 01:16
Can you help me with a problem in ansys static structural solver? sourabh.porwal Structural Mechanics 0 March 27, 2016 17:07


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:43.